Alertable improvements to Heat Warnings

Alertable has recently launched an improved integration with Environment Canada for extreme heat warnings.


The summer of 2021 has started out with record high temperatures and heat warnings across the country.  With this increase in high temps comes dangers for those who work outside and those indoors who lack air conditioning.

Heat

Environment Canada uses complicated criteria to determine when temperatures exceed normal values for several days in a row and it’s time to send out some heat warnings.  https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/types-weather-forecasts-use/public/criteria-alerts.html#heat

Unfortunately, because these warnings are for longer events, lasting days or weeks at a time, it can mean a high number of updates and reminders from Environment Canada.  This can lead to alert fatigue and result in people tuning out, or worse, turning off these warnings.

Alertable has recently launched an improved integration with Environment Canada that is designed to reduce alert fatigue.  Using new features Environment Canada just launched for this summer season, we’re now able to notify you only when there is a major change you should know about, and not send notifications for changes that aren’t as important. You can still check the Alertable app, website, smart assistant, and other channels at any time to get the very latest information.

Our thanks to Environment Canada for the great work they do in keeping us all informed about hazardous weather conditions here in Canada.  We’re hoping these new changes to Alertable will improve how longer duration events like extreme heat and cold are communicated.

Take care. Be prepared.

What are other tips we could talk about? Leave a comment below and let us know.

Read more on our Disaster Series:

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To sign up for Alertable, or to learn more, visit https://alertable.ca

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